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Music as a Modulator of Impulse Buying Behavior

Music as a Modulator of Impulse Buying Behavior
Typ:Bachelorarbeit, Masterarbeit
Datum:sofort
Betreuer:

Dr. Verena Dorner

Music has been identified as a powerful neuromodulator in the field of clinical neuroscience. For instance, music has been shown to facilitate movement and motor control in Parkinson patients (Raglio 2015). The activation of reward related regions of the brain such as the basal ganglia together with an increased release of dopamine has been associated with emotions and feeling states evoked by music (Salimpoor, V. et al. 2013; Salimpoor, Valorie et al. 2011). It is of little surprise that the modulatory potential of background music has been the focus of several studies investigating the effect of music on consumer purchasing behavior. An early study reported that fast-paced music is associated with customers moving more quickly through the store and ultimately buying less in relation to slow-beat music (Milliman 1982). These have been replicated by more recent research. In addition, it has been observed that high-tempo music increases purchases in persons with a tendency to impulse buying but not in costumers with utilitarian attitudes (Ma et al. 2017). Notably, to date most research has been done in classic shopping environments where customers were actively moving through a store when making their purchase decisions. Little is known how music affects shopping behavior online and ultimately how music changes the neural activity and psychophysiological states that underlie these effects on purchasing behavior. This research aims at investigating these questions by examining the effect of music on consumer behavior in an e-shop environment.

This thesis is part of an ongoing collaboration with Politecnico di Milano and will include communication with researchers and students in Milan. Good communication skills and fluently spoken English will be an advantage.

Please email verena.dorner@kit.edu for more information.